Aging Well Blog

 

You like being in the driver’s seat. It’s your life and you want to be sure you get to live it your way. Who wouldn’t?!?

Perhaps you cared for your parents and want things handled differently when you reach your own elderhood. Maybe you do not have children and wonder who will help you when you need it. Perhaps you do have children and want to have your independence, make your own decisions.

This blog is for those who want to proactively plan for their later years. Check out our monthly posts for thoughts that can help you decide what will work best for you in terms of housing, paying for care, and meeting life’s challenges as you age.

Want to set up a plan? Call us for a consultation: (210) 492-1224


“With a little help from our friends”: The Village movement

"With a little help from our friends": The Village movement

Are you looking for alternative ways to age in place and get the support services you need—now and in the future? The Village project is a national network of grassroots self-help groups that empower older adults to affordably assist each other as volunteers, reducing isolation and building community in the process.

Medicare coverage while traveling

Medicare coverage while traveling

One of the joys of retirement is the ability to travel. But you may not have Medicare coverage where you go. The rules for traveling outside the United States, and even outside your local network, are very strict and can be very limiting. Learn about the general coverage options for original Medicare, Medicare Advantage, and Part D plans. Also gain tips about purchasing travel insurance.

Solo aging: Eyes wide open

Aging comes to us all. What makes solo aging different is the need to be more proactive about arranging for help. Twenty-two percent of older adults acknowledge they will need to take care of themselves. (Even if you are partnered now or have children, you are wise to consider the possibility of solo aging because, well, things can change … death, divorce, estrangement. In that light, we are all potential solo agers.)

Getting rid of your stuff

Getting rid of your stuff

Once you get beyond the sentimental value of your belongings, you are still up against the logistics of how to get things out of your nest. Some stuff is easier to pass along to family than other stuff. Options for what’s left over: Sell, donate, or just “get rid of it!”

Thriving through life transitions

Thriving through life transitions

Change is the only constant. And as we enter our later years, it seems the changes are more frequent. Do you sense a transition occurring in your life? Whether the change was of your own making or seems thrust upon you, there are strategies to help you weather the process. And at the least, not feel so alone.

Should you move (closer to your kids)?

The most common reason to move in later years is to be closer to children and grandchildren. Regardless of your reason for relocating, unless you plan to live with family, there will be many hours of the day when you are just plain newbies in town. How will you spend your time? If proximity to younger kin is compelling your thoughts, clarify the role you want to play and see if it’s a shared vision.

“My kids treat me like a bank”

When an adult child asks for money, it’s hard to say no. You want to respond to a need. But perhaps your child perceives that you don’t need all you have, or that they’re simply requesting some of their inheritance, just a bit early. Before you answer, ask for time to think it over.

Adding smart home safety features

Adding smart home safety features

“Smarts” are in the eye of the beholder. What’s a smart home “gotta have” for one is simply “cute but unnecessary” to another. Check out the top recommendations for older adult smart home safety features.

Types of long-term care

In your elderhood, it may be that your best, most affordable option is a group care setting. Learn the difference between assisted living, memory care, skilled nursing (rehab), a nursing home, and a continuing care community (aka life plan community).

Assembling your support team

Your elder care support team will include friends and family, health care providers, and professional advisors. An Aging Life Care Manager can help you select wisely and coordinate these services effectively.